Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 5 October 2010

Hyde In War Time (1914-16) Page 33 - Continued.


Patriotism Of The Police Force
Splendid Loyalty Of The Police Force


A GALLANT POLICE OFFICER.

On the first of November, 1914, during the first battle of Ypres, a member of the Hyde Police Force, Corporal Harry Howland, of the Grenadier Guards, was struck in the right leg with a piece of shrapnel, his thigh bone being shattered. Howland, like his Police comrade, Wilkinson, had been in the terrific fighting on the Marne and on the Aisne. In fact, he had been fin a great deal of the thickest fighting for about eight weeks before being wounded. The wound put him permanently out of action. He was brought over to England, and for months was under treatment, undergoing several operation, but, unfortunately, it was found necessary to amputate his right leg. Ultimately the gallant Corporal improved and on Wednesday, November 24th, 1915, over twelve months after being wounded, he re-appeared in the town with a couple of crutches. Being unable to continue service either as a soldier or a policeman, Corporal Howland’s visit officially marked the severance of his connection with the Hyde Force, which he joined in April, 1913. Prior to his visit he was offered a life appointment on the estate of Sir Philip Sasson, in the county of Kent, and had also been granted a fairly substantial pension. A few prominent townspeople of Hyde subscribed a gift of money as a wedding present to the Corporal and his bride, and he was also presented with a large framed photograph of all the members of Hyde Police Force, including himself, and about a dozen who are at present serving with the colours, some of them being at the front when the year 1916 arrived.

2 comments:

Tom said...

I find it sad that such stories as are found between the pages of this book are not more generally know about.. We are getting to the part of the book soon where we find out about individuals, and what happen to them... this is a very moving part of the book and I'm happy that their stories are being aired on this blog instead of being left untold in little known books.

Hydonian said...

I agree with you Tom. There must be many good people that over the years have been forgotten about. This blog makes it a place to let other people hear about their heroism.