Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 16 November 2010

Joel Lane Primitive Methodist Chapel

Joel Lane Primitive Methodist Chapel was first organised in the 1870's in an old room at the bottom of Joel Lane in Gee Cross. The rent was £4 per annum. Prior to this services were held in a cottage situated lower down than the Werneth Hotel. The Room at the bottom of Joel Lane was really a loft over a stable that was heated by a coal stove in the centre of the premises. It was not uncommon for the services to be interrupted by the grunting of Pigs or braying of Donkeys - must have made for some interesting sermons! Abraham Lee from Compstall used to lead the singing and accompany it with his cello playing.

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The foundation stones were laid on the 29th May 1875 by :-

Mrs Horsefield of Slack House ,Hyde.
Mrs Thomas Beeley ,Hyde.
Mrs Ellis ,Grimsby.
Mrs John Lee's Buckley ,Woodley.

The opening services were held on February 27th and March 5th and 12th 1876 and the first minister was the Reverend J.Hall.
New classrooms were added in 1884 as the congregation grew and further improvements were carried out in 1904.

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The Hyde Primitive Methodist movement is said to have originated in a school held in Thomas Street,Floweryfield. The noted Methodist Hugh Bourne preached in Floweryfield around 1821 and the Thomas Street School was,in all probability , the outcome of his mission.

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Reverend Hugh Bourne


The Chapel was finally closed in the late 1960's and, after its demolition, a new Close named Buckley Close was built on the site named after one of the layers of the Chapels' original foundation stones.

Up Date From Our Comments

Prior to the gatherings in the old room at Joel Lane, the first gatherings were in the home of Abel Stafford who lived in one of the cottages that still stands at the bottom of Treacle brow. Missioners from Woodley commenced the work and the old P.M.curcuit of Woodley, Grieve Fold and Joel Lane survived unchanged until the mid 60's.

11 comments:

Tom said...

My niece now lives there.. the first of the two houses witch front Joel Lane.. The church was also where her mum and dad (my oldest brother.. deceased)were married. The wedding was in the late 60s by the way.

Tom said...

My brothers wedding was in 1969... and was one of the last to take place there.

Hydonian said...

Anymore photos Tom? Or perhaps one of the houses that are there now for a comparison?

Tom said...

I'll have a check of phone my niece for one.. ha! might even have one of the weeding.

Anonymous said...

And when it closed, the congregation joined Stockport Road Methodists.

Anonymous said...

Prior to the gatherings in the old room at Joel Lane, the first gatherings were in the home of Abel Stafford who lived in one of the cottages that still stands at the bottom of Treacle brow. Missioners from Woodley commenced the work and the old P.M.curcuit of Woodley, Grieve Fold and Joel Lane survived unchanged until the mid 60's.

Tom said...

Anon:
Thank you for your very informative comment, I will copy this into the post.
If you would like to add more please feel free, you can also email us.

Jean said...

Found this interesting as I have a Rev Hugh Bourne in my Family Tree.

Tom said...

Would it be the same one Jean?

Jean said...

Could well be all his descendants came from this area.

Tom said...

Hi Jean
I have just had a quick 'Google' and it seems that books have been written about him... it seems he had a brother called William..