Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Monday, 10 January 2011

Elephants in Hyde

Elephants in Hyde

Not much Known about this shot. Think it was probably something to do with a exhibition/event that was held at Newton Bank Printworks in the 1960's whose theme was Africa..
The Elephants are walking past Hepworths which was on the corner of Clarendon Street and Market Place. Strawberry Gardens fruit shop is there now.

Photobucket

Any information on this gratefully received :)

8 comments:

elevendaysinmay said...

The only time I remember Elephants in Tameside was when Billy Smarts Circus was on in King Georges Playing Fields in Ashton. I know when the circus was over they walked (as in your photo) to Stalybridge station. I don't know where they walked when they arrived

Tom said...

I do hope we can find something out about this. I am sure I woke up by the fountain seeing 'pink elephants' flying above the White Lion once.... but that was a Boddingtons induced dream. ha!

Anonymous said...

50 years ago [blimey, seems like a million] I worked at the Calico Printers [handblock printing] and later at Ashton Bros.
They made cloth prints for Africa I seem to recall. All I think about now are the cockroaches [they liked the warm and humid atmosphere.
What has become of the area?
It is that long since I visited Hyde, thanks for the memories

Tom said...

Thank you for commenting... I happy it as bought happy memories back to you... The print works is still there... and a small part of Ashton Brothers still stands... feel free to contact us if you would like to see a certain area now and we will try to get you some pictures sorted... our email here is hydonian@gmail.com we get many requests and are happy to help where we can...

Anonymous said...

I worked in the warehouse at Newton Bank in the summer of 1959. The lower part of the site was where they produced batik prints (pronounced the Northern way, no fancy batique stuff here) They had quality control posters around the site saying "Batiks are your bread and butter". The staff liked this and used to order Batik butties in the canteen. Other parts of the site produced non-batik prints and there was an area devoted to hand-blocking. This was reckoned to be skilled work. After many of the prints had been produced they were then run through a steam machine called a stenter or stentor which gave them a finish. Most of the prints were destined for West Africa. I particularly remember a print called Vandyke Bars which was a vivid yellow and blue chevron affair. The prints were refered to as one/two/three colour, but the ground colour was disregarded. Newton Bank also handled prints produced at other CPA factories and a lot of the production was sent out to their works at Levenshulme. The latter works also processed the copper rollers that were used in printing.

Kind regards
Roger Brian

Tom said...

Hello and welcome Roger..
I might find a suitable picture and make your comment into a new post... thank you for the information.

jan said...

my Dad designed and produced the "float" in your photo .............. I think for the wakes.. but He is still alive and well if you want to check!!

Tom said...

Hi Jan
thank you for commenting on this post.. if you dad as any pictures or memories he'd like to say we'd love to see them.