Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Monday, 11 April 2011

Throstle Bank Bridge

Pictures From Susan Jaleel and Paul Taylor

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I had not seen the post card of Throstle Bank Bridge until two weeks ago when it came up on ebay.... I bid for it, and eventually won. Before it arrived in the post Paul Taylor give me that photo disk and it was on that...and then last weekend Susan Jaleel sent in scans of her collection of post cards and some of her own pictures and again it was amongst them. Still it is always nice to have your own little collection. 


In the booklet that came with the photo disk " Pictorial History Of Old Hyde On Photo CD. by Paul Taylor. Paul writes the following:


The Throstle Bank Bridge was built around 1900. The railway itself had been built in 1858 when a branch line was run from the main line at Hyde Junction to Hyde. Hyde was the terminus for many years; the extension to Marple was completed in 1863.
Before the bridge was built access to Dukinfield Road was made by a tunnel underneath the railway line, a few dozen yards to the right of the present bridge. This tunnel is still in use today. Dukinfield Road ended at this point until the bridge was built and was then extended under the bridge to meet up with Newton Street.



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Map Source:   Ordnance Survey
Survey Year:                   c1875
OS Grid Ref:SJ 943 954


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Map Source:  Ordnance Survey
Survey Year:                    c1910
OS Grid Ref:SJ 943 954

The above maps from 1875 and 1910 show how the area changed.  

8 comments:

Dave Williams said...

There appear to be trolley bus wires on the first picture, but the picture's far too early for trolley buses so they must be for trams. There only appears to be one set of tram tracks though, so it looks as if there was only one-way traffic round this bend, which accounts for the two wires being so close to each other. It would be interesting to know how they determined right of way. Not much traffic seems to have used the road as evidenced by the figures standing in the road underneath the bridge in what would be a positively suicidal position nowadays.

Tom said...

I think I can throw some light on this with the help of Paul Taylor's booklet, and a map or two...

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

When I saw "Throstle Bank Bridge" I thought it referred to the one across Throstle Bank Street but I see it is not that one but the one over Dukinfield Road. The two maps are interesting - I note that Caxton Works is marked on the later one but is earlier labelled as Mary Street Iron Works.
The map also marks Wilson Brook which until recently was invisible within the Automasters complex but now is openly visible within the new housing complex there.

Dave Williams said...

When I was in the area at the beginning of March trying to find out if the building which had been the 'Bank Cottage' still existed I took a couple of photos of the old tunnel, which is now signposted 'Footpath to Flowery Field Church'. I'll email them to you.

Tom said...

Thanks Dave...
We can do a different posting with them I think.

Dave Williams said...

The street going off on the left of the pictures is what remains of the northern end of Edward Street and leads to the end of Mary Street. On the other side of the M67 the southern end of Edward Street emerges onto Manchester Road between Clark Way and the railway bridge, and the building which used to be the Swan Hotel is on the corner between Edward Street and Clark Way.

Tom said...

Well spotted Dave....

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

Footpath to Flowery Field