Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 19 July 2011

Back Lane / Lumn area article.

Here is an article about the Back Lane and the Lumn area of Hyde that was written by Ron Braddock and featured in the Reporter some years ago.


Stone Row Reservoir


"The Queen Street junction, which is located some 219 yards from Smithy Lane, was originally an entrance to a cul-de-sac.
In 1872 it was called "Queens Dock" and contained seven houses which were sited near a gasometer. They were demolished to make way for the factory extension which was built along Back Lane.

Stone Row Reservoir  2

The name Queens Dock was partly retained when the existing road was extended to Market Street. The new road was called Queen Street and recent demolition has deprived it of many houses.
Opposite the Queen Street junction is a corporation signpost which indicates the routes to Stockport and Sheffield. The post is sited on the east side of Lumn Road, close to a new apartment block.

Lumb Road Signpost

The row of old stone cottages on the west side of Lumn Road which exited from Queen Street to a point near Wood Street were built before 1841. Until quite recently there was a reservoir behind theses houses called 'Stone Row'

Stone Row

Beyond 'Stone Row' is the Gardeners public house which can be traced back to 1833. It is located on the corner of Wood Street and Lumn Road. In 1841 when the place was held by the trustees of the late Joseph Horsfield and occupied by Jesse Howarth the rateable value was £28. Other publicand were Thomas Platt 1835, Lucy Wild 1838 and Lucy Hawarth 1865.

Gardeners Arms Hyde

In 1891 the Gardeners Arms was owned by Margaret Horsfield of Longlands ,Godley and the licensee was Charles E. Barber. The pub was a freehouse and there were 2 beds for travellers and accomodation for supplying refreshments for 30 persons. Provisions of stabling consisted of a stable with two stalls and the Gardeners Arms was described as being a "good house".

4 comments:

Tom said...

Very interesting post Nancy... I enjoyed getting an old map or two out and looking at the area... and as for the Gardeners Arms I've always found it a 'good house' especially when Lester Moores was the landlord.

Peter Maugham said...

The 1871 Census lists William Maugham as the landlord, also present was his wife Elizabeth (nee Cooke) and 2 daughters Lucy Wild & Hannah. They were confirmed as present until 1878 where William was listed in the Post Office Directory. By 1896 they had returned to the family home at Greenhill, Godley with additional children William Henry and Frances Mary.

Tom said...

Thank you for the updated information Peter.

westarsteve said...

we lived in stone row when i was little we had an outside toilet and we had to have a tin bath in the front room the number was 134 i think it had the reservoir for norths behind our house i also seem to remember the end house next to queen street being a shop