Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Friday, 11 November 2011

LEST WE FORGET.

Gone,but NEVER Forgotten.

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10 comments:

Werneth Low said...

Thank you. My dad's elder brother, William Ollerenshaw of the 21st Service Batallion, The Manchester Regiment, was one of those 710 men of Hyde who never camme home. He was 22 years old when he lost his life on 25 March 1917. Our family lived out the next 40 years in the shadow of that tragedy. Along with the memorial on Werneth Low, he is commemorated on the town hall tribute and the one inside Holy Triity Church. His short life is not forgotten.

Ceecee said...

My Grand-dad William Nightingale of the 10th Battalion Cheshire Regiment was one of the 710 heroes from Hyde who gave his life in the defense of our country.He was 28 and left 3 small children. Thank You to all our brave servicemen from past to present.

Mike Brierley said...

My Great Uncle, Harry Delve is another of the 710. He was with the 9th Cheshires and died near Ypres in September 1917. Such a sad time.

Hydonian said...

There are two of the 710 in our family.
My Great Uncle Harry Mullins of the 1st/6th Bn. Cheshire Regiment who died aged just 18 & Great Uncle William Morris MM of the 1st Bn. Kings Own Lancaster Regiment who died aged 27.
Gone, but most definitely not forgotten.

Hydonian said...

Incidentally, My Great-Uncle Harry Mullins had been fighting on the frontline for 18 months before his untimely death at 18 years old - He lied about his age to enlist to fight for his country. Such a sad story...and one which, I suppose, was repeated up and down the country during the wars.

Tom said...

I'm sure it was Nancy.. look around today at our youths, they are far more aggressive but I don't think they would have fared as well coping with the the horrors that would have awaited them then..

Hydonian said...

Very true Tom. I doubt many would lie about their ages to be able to go to the frontlines.

Anonymous said...

Hi Team, could you help me find out what happened to ten Cheshire Reg men they are in a C.W.W.G. (Landican) Birkenhead. they all died together 12.3.41 I visit the C.W.W.G. every year to pay my respects to them and all the others. any help would be appreciated. some have D infront on their service No. one being:D/4205193 SGT. A. Stone. Thanks Graham

Tom said...

Anon
Email me here at hydonian@gmail.com and I will see what I can come up with..
Sergeant Alfred Stone was with the 8th (H.D.) Bn. Cheshire Regiment the H.D. being I believe the Home Defence.. let me have a list of the others and see if we can come up with something..

Tom said...

Anon
I found the list on the War Grave Commission's site... and with a bit of searching on google I came up with other 8th (H.D.) Bn. who died on the same day... this Bn, could have been manning anti aircraft guns or other such munitions on the day/night of bombing raids.. what ever it was quite a few died that day.. The 'D' Suffix before their service number seems to be something that was done when men had been placed with other regiments.. a lot of the H.D. were older or were on reserve and had come from other regiments.. ( I'm not 100% on that) As for what happened on that day it might be worth getting in touch with the 'Cheshire's' and inquiring about it. If you do please let me know what is found out.