Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Sunday, 15 April 2012

Auction of land in Hyde 1882

A paper showing a sale of land by auction in Hyde in 1882.

The auction was held at The Norfolk Arms public house.
When I sort out the papers properly I will print a selection of what the buildings etc went for !

Makes great reading.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Thanks to Jack and Doreen Morris for letting us show this.

4 comments:

Tom said...

I wonder about the story behind the sale Nancy... would you know which factory and houses this sale was for?

Dave Williams said...

In the booklet 'Hyde Cotton Mills' by Ian Haynes there's a description of Marler's Mill:
'This factory, which was run by members of the Marler family throughout its existence, was located on the west side of Ashton Road, Newton, just to the south of Lodge Street. Built by John Marler, a machine maker of Newton, it is first recorded on the land tax returns of 1827.'
And then later:
'....in 1882 the mills were put up for sale by the mortgagees of Thomas Marler, of the firm of James Marler & Brothers, in liquidation. At that time they contained 432 looms in three sheds and an unknown number of spindles, the machinery being turned by two beam engines by Kay, of about 40 hp and 25 hp, and four horizontal engines. Marler's Mill was never put to work again and within five years had been demolished.'

This is perhaps the Freehold Cottom Mill referred to in this paper.

Tom said...

Thank you Dave...

Hydonian said...

My mum has all the houses,cottages and building involved in this - I'll post some when I look through them - there are lots !!