Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 29 May 2012

Glove Workers

Here are a couple of photos that were sent to us a while ago.
I believe that they show the workers in a Gee Cross Glove Factor.

Photobucket

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If anyone has any information about them please get in contact.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wasn't that a glove factory on Brabyns (?) Road?

Dave Williams said...

I have a newspaper cutting of the second picture which was published in a souvenir edition of The Reporter called "All Our Yesterdays" about 20 years ago. The caption under the picture says: "The glove-making industry is still in existence in Hyde, but it is by no means as strong as it was. This factory was in Gee Cross (Tameside Local Studies Library)".

"The History of Hyde" lists several glove-makers but doesn't show Brabyns Road as the address for any of them, although it does list R. Knott and Co., Glove Manufacturers, Gee Cross. It also shows Frank Saxon and Co., Ralph Fold, Gee Cross - was Ralph Fold where Brabyns Road now is?

Bill Lancashire said...

Ralph Fold lay between School Lane and Rowbotham street.

My Dad (now aged 92) worked in the glove industry all his working life. At one time - in the mid thirties - he worked for Ollerenshaws, which was somewhere up Gee Cross. Later he completed his apprenticeship at Watkins on Mary Street, where he stayed up to his retirement.

Dave Williams said...

In a chapter in "The History of Hyde" entitled "Some Modern Industries" Thomas Middleton has a section headed "Chamois leather and Glove Industry" where he mentions the following firms:

George North started business in Catherine Street, Hyde, in 1876, but soon moved to Robert Street where he was joined by his brother Richard, the name of the company being changed to North Brothers. In 1882 that company merged with the firm of the brothers' father to become James North and Sons at Tower Street, and 10 years later they moved to Godley Mills.

The firm of Bury and Hopwood, Boardman Street, was founded in 1894.

The business of Geo. B Moores Ltd, Werneth Leather Works, Gee Cross, was founded in 1901. Mr Moores took the old mill in Hunt Croft Quarry, part of the building known as Whittaker's Whim.

The firm of R. Ollerenshaw and Co. Ltd, Criterion Leather Works, Hoviley Brow was founded in 1919.

"Other well-known and progressive local firms in the chamois leather industry are Aveyard Bros, Newton, who are large manufacturers of motor clothing leather; Frank Saxon and Co., Ralph Fold, Gee Cross; the Hyde Chamois Leather Co. Ltd, Travis Street, founded by Mr A Ollerenshaw; Marshall Bros; R. Knott and Co., Glove Manufacturers, Gee Cross; The Brooke Chamois Leather Dressing Co., Market Street; Norman Jackson Ltd, Glove Manufacturers, Gee Cross; C. Watkin and Co., Glove Manufacturers, Mary Street; Gee Cross Leather Co., Great Norbury Street."

There is, by the way, a building in Shawcross Street (off Mottram Old Road just past the junction with Stockport Road) which is now apparently split into 17 apartments and is known as The Old Tannery. Presumably this was formerly used by one of the companies involved in the Chamois Leather and Glove industry.

Bill Lancashire said...

Apologies ... I was wrong when I said my Dad worked at Ollerenshaws. I asked him yesterday and he told me that he worked for a few weeks at The Gee Cross Glove Works, which was off Mottram Old Road. Presumably where 'The Old Tannery' flats are now.

Trish said...

My mother in law Phyllis Mullineaux made me a list of the places where she worked for a family history book I was starting. She stated she worked at the leather gloves company Norman Jackson Ltd which I understand was off Mottram Old Rd, Gee Cross then she went on to work at Ollerenshaws and the notes I have states they were on Hoviely. My mother in law died in 2000 at the age of 85, just a week short of her 86th birthday

Carole Jones said...

Thanks for the great photos. the second of which has my great grandfather John Clayton and his brother David who both worked as chamois leather dressers. David Clayton is the chap on the left with his sleeves rolled up and a moustache, and John is 2 down that line, just leaning forward. Judging by another photo I have with my grandmother in it, I think it must be around 1908. My mother remembers that they were friendly with the Ollerenshaw family.

Tom said...

Hi Carole
thank you for commenting on this post and naming the chaps.. It's great to be able to add names and such to this old photo's... so glad you looked in.

Anonymous said...

Charles Watkin & Co.Ltd. had two factories, Eldon Street Chorlton on Medlock and Mary Street, Hyde, employing a total of about 220 workers. The directors were the Lowcock family. From starting as Junior Secretary I soon became in charge of the weekly payroll (1948-57) and well remember many of the names of employees and what their roles were. I remember the name Lancashire and rather think there were two brothers who were leather cutters, though as they were at the Hyde factory as I never met them. In addition to the two factories, there was a warehouse selling to the trade - F.C.Lowock & Co.Ltd., High Street Manchester 4.

Joanne Edwards said...

Isn't there a leatherworks on Lumn Road in Hyde?