Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 28 August 2012

ANDREW AND ATKINSON BREWERS

 Sara Jones recently contacted us with these photos and this message...

"Hi there, I have a glass bottle ANDREW AND ATKINSON with original stopper
please could you tell me anything you might know about it..I dug it up from a victorian tip 
in Tintwistle, Derbyshire about 18 years ago..
Many thanks. "

026 

024

If anyone has any information on these brewers please contact us.

Many thanks, Sara ! :)

Updated


Mineral and Beer Bottling in Hyde
First, regarding the stone Botanic Beer Jar. The Botanic Beer and Mineral Water Company was started in 1889/90 by father and son, John Tetlow (Unemployed Hatter) 64 Stockport Road, Gee Cross; and George Naylor Tetlow (Cotton Weaver), 131 Back Lane, Hyde. Their bottling plant was in Townsend Street, just off  Lumb Road. The company traded under the name the Tetlow Bros, although they were father and son. By 1895 the company was in financial difficulty and on June 13, 1895, Edward Lawton, Trustee, of 13 Brown Street, Manchester, was appointed by the court in Ashton under Lyne to run the company until it was out of debt or liquidated. George Naylor Tetlow thereafter moved to Blackpool.
Secondly, Thomas Middleton got it wrong when he said Andrew and Atkinson was formed about 1868. The founder of the Andrew's "Water Mineral and Bottling Company” Ralph Andrew, was at that time the landlord of the Bank Field Inn on Mottram Road.  It was in the mid 1870's that Ralph Andrew in partnership with his son (William Thomas Andrew) and his nephew (William Henry Andrew),  set up his beer  and mineral bottling plant on the corner of Lilley Street and Mottram Old Road.
Thomas Middleton may have been confused with the Mineral Water Manufacturing Company of Andrew and Shepley. Founded in the late 1860’s by John Andrew and David Shepley, the company traded from their bottling plant in Cheapside until the partnership was dissolved in 1879:- The London Gazette, March 7, 1879.
     We the undersigned, hereby give notice, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the under  the name of Andrew and Shepley, Cheapside, Hyde Mineral Water Manufacturers and wholesale bottlers of Ale, is hereby dissolved by mutual consent. The business will be hereafter carried out in the name of Shepley and West, at the premises at Cheapside, to whom all accounts due and payable to the said firm of Andrew and Shepley, must be paid, and who will discharge all accounts owing by the said firm. – As witness our hands this 26th day of February, 1879.
                                                                                     John Andrew. David Shepley.
  
At the same time, the late nineteenth century, there were a small number of other mineral bottling companies in Hyde. William Coulthard’s  Gee Cross Water Mineral Company, Higgins and Broadbent on Tower Street, Hyde;  John Holland, was bottling mineral water at his plant on Mottram Road; Edwin Wilkinson 88 Mottram Road, and John Frederick's Cheetham's was bottling mineral water at his premises at 17 Knight Street, he later moved to Oldham, where he continued manufacturing Mineral Water. But foremost among the Brewing and Mineral Water Companies in Hyde during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, was the Hyde, Denton, and Glossop Mineral Water Company. It is hard to determine when the company was formed, but it was certainly bottling mineral water before 1890 at its bottling plant in Simpson Street, near Hyde Central Station. John Aldred was the Chairman of the Company F.J. Houltfitth was the Secretary, and Frank Oldfield the works manager.
        However, since its formation sometime in the late 1880's, till its demise around 1930, the Hyde, Denton, and Glossop Mineral Water Company had a much checkered history.
         At an Extraordinary General Meeting of the Company, duly convened, and held at the offices of the company, Simpson Street, Hyde, on 28th of October 1891 the following special resolution was duly pass; and at a subsequent Extraordinary General Meeting of the Members of the Company, also duly convened, and held in the same place, on 12 of November, 1891 the said Special Resolution was duly confirmed:- "That the Company be wound up voluntarily, and a new Company formed; giving the present shareholders the privilege of taking up shares at a rate to be decided.
                                                                               John Aldred, Chairman.
The Hyde, Denton and Glossop Mineral Water Manufacturing Company finally turned off the lights two years later.
             Notice is hereby given, that  a General Meeting of Members of the Hyde, Denton, and Glossop Mineral Water Manufacturing Company Limited will be held at 12, Victoria -buildings in the city of Manchester, on the 14th day of November, 1893, at three o'clock in the afternoon precisely, for the purpose of having an account laid before them by the liquidator (pursuant of section 14), of the said company has been conducted, and the property disposed of, and the hearing of any explanation that may be given by the liquidator - Dated 10th day of October 1893.
                                                             William Nabb, Liquidator.
Charles Creese bought the business, lock stock, and barrel and renamed it "The New Hyde, Denton, Glossop Mineral Water Company." He immediately moved operations to 3 Cheapside, Hyde.
      Charles Creese was born in Ashton- Under- Lyne in 1880, the son of Frederick and Elizabeth Creese, landlords of the Friendship Inn, Old Street.  Charles Creese  married Jane Ogden at Ashton in 1901, shortly after they took over the running of the Commercial Hotel, 3 Commercial Brow, Hyde. By 1906 he had left the Commercial Hotel and moved into new premises at 30 Commercial Street, here he opened a grocer and beer retailing business. By 1923 he had moved into better premises at 126 Market Street, selling wines and spirits.
However, by 1929 the New Hyde Denton, and Glossop Mineral Water Manufacturing Company had run into debt. At an Extraordinary General Meeting of the company, duly convened, and held at 3 Cheapside, Hyde, on Tuesday, the third day of December, 1929, at 11.30 in the morning, the following Special Resolution was passed. “That the Company be wound up voluntarily, and that Arthur Scott Chartered Accountant, of 3 Corporation Street, Hyde, Cheshire, be appointed Liquidator for the purpose of winding up the company.”
                                                      Charles Creese, Chairman.
The last notice I have found regarding the New Hyde, Denton, and Glossop Mineral Water Manufacturing Company Ltd, reads:-
Notice is hereby given in pursuance of Section 236 of the Companies Act, 1929, that a General Meeting of the Members of the above Company will be held at The Brewery, Cheapside, Hyde, in the County of Chester on Friday, 25th day of April, 1930, at eleven in the morning precisely, for the purpose of having an account laid before them and to receive the Liquidator’s report showing how the winding up of the Company has been conducted and the property of the Company disposed of, and of hearing any explanation that may be given by the Liquidator; and also of determining, by Extraordinary Resolution, the manner in which the books, accounts, papers and documents of the Company, and of the Liquidator thereof, shall be disposed of:- Dated the 19th day of March, 1930.
                                                             Arthur Scott, Liquidator.
The bottling plant in Cheapside was taken over by Walker and Humphray’s in January 1930.
Shortly after the liquidation of his company, Charles Creese moved to Gregory Avenue, Romiley. In 1934 he was a Councilor for the Godley Ward; he died in Bredbury in 1952.

                                                     Jeffrey Stafford.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

http://hydonian.blogspot.co.uk/2011/06/andrew-and-atkinson.html This was covered here

Jeffrey Stafford said...


I sent in a history of a number of Brewers in Hyde months back and it still hasn't appeared on the Blog. That is why I don't send anything in any longer. The same goes for a story entitled "The Body in the Trunk," sent in months back. In fact, I recently up-dated my article on local brewers. My brother sent in an article I had given him on Risket Riley, and that's not been on the blog yet. Except for an occasional glance at the blog I now stick to the Manchester Blog, Manmates.

Tom said...

Hi Jeffrey
Sorry you feel let down, for quite a while now Nancy as been doing more than the 'Lions Share' of the daily running of the blog because I have need to take a step back for health reasons. We have a reserve of item sent in for us from good people such as yourself and we will get around to posting such item. At this time the posts will be short and sweet while both me and Nancy attend to health and family matters.

Jeff said...


Thank you Tom for your quick response, didn't want to cause friction.

Tom said...

No problem Jeff..

jeff said...

Correction; Lilley Street and Mottram Old Road should read Mottram Road and Taylor Street.

Jeff.

Werneth Low said...

The thing about sending stuff in and it not appearing is that you have no idea if it has been received, although when I send anything, I never presume the right to have it published - that is for those who do a wonderful job with the admin to decide. Take care all.

Bill Lancashire said...

Coming back to the subject of the blog, I once found an Andrews and Atkinson bottle (just like the one in the picture) on the back of Werneth Low. I was walking across the field you come to from the lane that passes the side of HCC ground, past one of the old wooden 'weekend cottages' that had virtually fallen to the ground. Out of interest I went over to look inside and saw that there were quite a few relics of its former glory day remaining. An old bed, a cupboard, chairs etc. And there, sticking out of the mud, was this old green bottle. Which I picked up, took home and washed, to discover that it was from A & A. I left the bed and the cupboard!

Anonymous said...

I think its rather rude to comment about what the blog owners post as people should remember that this is done for the love of it and not for profit.
Plenty of us enjoy this daily look into Hyde life.

Keep up the good work and hope all your family and health issues get resolved soon.
God Bless.

Elsie Dee