Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Saturday, 15 September 2012

Market Place


I changed the picture at the top of the site this week, with this great old view looking along Market Place. Our friend and fellow contributor John Taylor got in touch with us asking if we could try and find the same view but taken in the 1960's, and showing Cables Shoe Shop on the corner. I've had a look at what we've got, checked on Tameside Archives but had no luck..... John as looked on  numerous web sites but as never come up with anything taken from this angle. So if you have one at the back of your draw or in your collection I'd love to be able to show it on here and make John's day   

10 comments:

theMEGLET said...

Lovely and clear photo.

Searle's was such a great looking building, with a magnificent roofline, which is a bit reminiscent of The old Post Office building on Corporation St.

Also, nice to see how, the then longer, Norfolk St joined the Market Place.

Gillian said...

What a great picture - the first time I've ever seen this view. What do you think is in the window on the corner under Searles? Was it shoes back then I wonder. Interesting to see the location of where so many of our ancestors had their photos taken. From the dress it must have been pre 1900 I'd say.

John Taylor said...

Hi Tom thanks for all your help in re posting the photo. However it was not Barry from Oz that wanted a pic from the 1960's but I :-)

Thanks again. John.

John Taylor said...

Yes Gillian shoes, clothing and when I started work there in 1960 my boss told me it was also a hatters back then. I found an old machine in the cellar used for stretching men's hats to attest to that story.

I think the 'photo was taken around 1890 by Searle. Across the street you will see "Brownson's tower" that became Woolworths, where my mother worked in 1936, and right next door in a smaller shop Brownsons men's outfitters moved.

What I can't figure out is what is the square tower on the right hand side down the street towards Clarendon Place?

Anyone got an idea?

Tom said...

Was it the Mechanic Institute.. or the Reform Club?.. I'm sure that building is featured on the blog.

John Taylor said...

It could have been the reform club Tom but on the blog the picture of this has a pointed roof unless it's a trick of light on the Searle photo and it has somehow vanished :-)

Dave Williams said...

It looks like it WAS the Reform Club and there was a post about it on 30 July 2010.

Tom said...

Cheers Dave... you're a star ;O)

Marjorie said...

There used to be a hatters there with a slogan in the window "if you want to get ahead wear a hat." and the little shop next to it, near the lamp post, was a tobacconists. You could buy clay pipes there. Great for blowing bubbles!

Anonymous said...


It was the Reform club, it stood directly across from the top of Russell Street. It was later used for the school clinic. Around the corner from the Reform club in Foundary Street lived a family named Howarth, the father had a clubfoot. Across from the Reform club on the corner of Russell Street was the off -licence (known by locals as the top shop) next door was Bridges the bakers. Froggats were on the corner of Foundary Street and Market Place.