Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
BLOG still being updated, please keep commenting as it all goes to making a good read and helps to build an archive.


Wednesday, 3 October 2012

The Times Newspaper 1889

I was recently delighted to receive a copy of  The Times Newspaper dated  Saturday January 19th 1889 from a company called Historic Newspapers.

Historic Newspaper is an internet company who specialise in finding newspapers for occasions or special dates. All you need to do is give them the date you wish to buy a newspaper for ie a 50th birthday date or even a historic date or particular place you'd like to know about and they will set about matching up their findings with your needs from their original newspaper archives..

In the newspaper I recieved was this original account of the Colliery explosion in Hyde.
Sorry about the quality - blame my scanner !!


collieryno1

collieryno2-1

collieryno2-2

collieryno4

They make great unusual gifts for special occasions.

Their website is as follows if anyone is interested in taking a look at them..
http://www.historic-newspapers.co.uk/

 Photobucket
The blue plaque in memory of 23 men and boys killed and five seriously injured in the underground explosion on Friday, 18 January 1889.

4 comments:

theMEGLET said...

By chance I happened to walk past the site of the disaster just this week and read the plaque.

I think you have to be part of a special breed to become a miner, today, yes, but even more so then.

Anonymous said...


You would be very lucky if you could find a mine today. Yet we are importing 32,000 tons of coal a week from Poland.

Anonymous said...

Barry in Oz. All of my maternal ancesters were coal minors as well as my paternal Grandfather. My Great, Great Grandfather worked at this pit in the late 1800s and lived in Ridling Lane. My paternal Grandfather went down the pit at age 10 and worked in a shaft 3 feet high with 12 inches of water laying on his stomach. He retired as a miner aged 65.

Jean said...

One of my ancesters was killed in the explosion and his brother badly burned, they were identified by there father who had done the previous shift.