Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Saturday, 17 August 2013

Castle Street Revisited

Carrying on from yesterdays post with this picture sent in by David,  I've taken the liberty of showing a few snippets from the original.

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The road that the lady in the picture is walking up is Sheffield Road, I never realised Sheffield Road actually starts opposite the Railway Pub where the paper shop is on Commercial Brow.  

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Looks like a BSA motorbike, any thoughts on it anybody.


8 comments:

downsie21 said...

Great enlargements Tom, very sharp, obviously got an excellent programme.

Anonymous said...

These are without doubt some of the finest pictures that I have ever seen on this blog. Scenes of Godley that we will never recapture. It was nice to see the people walking near Sammy's Pit.

Chris Han said...

Awesome photo, Tom, great quality.

As I've mentioned in a previous post the cobbles along this stretch of Sheffield Road are still there and still give a great feeling of 'old' Hyde.
Looks like those men in the motorbike photo are doing a spot of fishing.
What an anglers dream having a fishing hole right outside the back door.

Werneth Low said...

How wonderful, Tom, thank you. Whilst I'm not too familiar with Godley, what caught my eye was the Class 76 EMI hauling its load over the arches. These locos were introduced after the electrification of the Woodhead line, and series 2 in the early-mid 50s were built at Gorton Locomotive Works, or Gorton Tank as we prefer to call it. There is a perfectly preserved example in the NRM at York.

Gorton Tank was a very special place for me as it was where I had my first job after leaving school in the early 60s. Sadly, thanks to Dr Beeching and his crazy ideas of reorganization , I was transferred to Piccadilly Station, and Gorton closed completely eventually . I wonder how many men and women of Hyde worked at The Tank.

waterman said...

Superb pictures, a bit overgrown now, but I'm sure that wooden gate is still there now in the stone wall. My dad used to work at gorton tank as a railway bobby in the 60's and lives in Hyde.

Dave KAG said...

Being educated at Hyde Grammar School, affectionately known as "Dr Couzens Academy for the Sons of Young Gentlefolk",we spent half of our school day at Longlands, the school annexe away up Mottram Road just before the Hattersley estate. There was a school bus but those of us who went to Longlands in the afternoon would walk in our dinner hour, following the path of the people in the photo, under the viaduct. The picture brought back great memories.
Dave

Dave KAG said...

I have just checked the distance from Hyde Grammar to Longlands, 1.5 miles and we walked home to Dukinfield, 3 miles. Those were the days.

Bill Lancashire said...

Dave KAG's comments about the Grammar School reminded me that when we were sent out on our 'cross country' runs (by Fred Whyatt) we used to take that route past Sammy's Pit and up the part of Sheffield Road shown in the picture. Then we went across Barm Houses, across the fields and valley until we eventually made our way onto Victoria Street and back down the road to the school.