Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 20 August 2013

Mottram Church

Two Etchings dated 1795 of Motrram Church

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This is what Thomas Middleton wrote in The History Of Hyde

The old Church at Mottram is dedicated to St. Michael. It is said that the stone of which the fabric is composed came from the neighbouring township of Tintwistle. The church (with the village clustering beneath it) is situated on a hill about 750 feet high, and commands a fine view of the surrounding country. It is a rugged looking old pile, and has not inaptly been defined as the Cathedral of East Cheshire. Mottram Church is first mentioned in 1291, but the present body and chancel of the edifice were erected, on the site of a former building, in the 14th century. The tower was built sometime after that date. Funds for the erection of the tower were left by Sir Ed. Shaa, the Lord Mayor of London, mentioned in Richard III. The church contains two private chapels. One on the south side formerly belonged to the Earls of Stamford and Warrington, but passed, with the sale of the Hattersley Manor, to the late J. Chapman, Esq., of Hill End. That on the north was known as the Hollingworth Chapel, and appertained to the old De Hollyngworthe family. After the death of Captain De Hollyngworthe, it was sold by his executors to E. H. Shellard, Esq., from whom it passed to Mr. J. Wood, of Arden, and was purchased from the executors of that gentleman by Canon Miller; who, being anxious to place the organ in it, made over his personal rights to the parishioners for ever The parishioners possess also, by faculty, the right to an open roadway through the chapel to the parish vestry and to the Communion Table.

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One of the most ancient monuments in the Church is an effigy of a knight and his lady, perpetuating—according to tradition—the memory of Sir Ralph edifice were erected, on the site of a former building, in the 14th century. The tower was built some time after that date. Funds for the erection of the tower were left by Sir Ed. Shaa, the Lord Mayor of London, mentioned in Richard III. The church contains two private chapels. One on the south side formerly belonged to the Earls of Stamford and Warrington, but passed, with the sale of the Hattersley Manor, to the late J. Chapman, Esq., of Hill End. That on the north was known as the Hollingworth Chapel, and appertained to the old De Hollyngworthe family. After the death of Captain De Hollyngworthe, it was sold by his executors to E. H. Shellard, Esq., from whom it passed to Mr. J. Wood, of Arden, and was purchased from the executors of that gentleman by Canon Miller; who, being anxious to place the organ in it, made over his personal rights to the parishioners for ever The parishioners possess also, by faculty, the right to an open roadway through the chapel to the parish vestry and to the Communion Table

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I'll end with this one which I took November 2008

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

What a grim scene it must have been when they dug up the remains of the Godley poison victimsin the church yard.

Tom said...

I only thought there was the one victim and a number of chickens... I have the story plan ready for another post.

Dave B said...

Top class 2008 photo of church and surroundings on misty day, very atmospheric, must be well chuffed capturing that one Tom...

Anonymous said...

I have the full story of the Godley poison victims. Mr. Little, Hyde's Special Chief Constable had them dug up. No chickens are mentioned, or is that a chicken joke?

Tom said...

Dave B, thank you.. I wish I'd taken a few more that day.
Anon.
Any chance of you sending in the account you have.. I only have a shortened version.. the chickens belonged to a neighbour of the victim and ate some of the poison pudding..

Anonymous said...

I should have put victim and not victims, the neigbours chickens died after they had eaten the pudding left overs that at been thrown away. The murderer and her sons later moved to Oxford Road in Dukinfield, she was arrested at that address after her accomplice had walked into Stalybridge Police Station and made a full confession.

Werneth Low said...

Is it just me or does anyone else find Mottram Church creepy? I've felt this from being young and have no idea why. From the Low I never want to look in that direction because I know it's there and that's nothing to do with the blot called Hattersley.