Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Friday, 3 January 2014

Hyde Library To Close



Well the writing is on the wall for the library building... it will either be leased out or sold.. I'm not sure which to be honest. The Library will be moved to the Town Hall.
Link to a PDF Document  "gotocentres111213" below

[PDF]


centres - Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council

Another great old building which should be for the benefit of of the townsfolk is going to be lost in the near future. Be it leased out or sold either way we the people will have no right to walk around the building as we should. Isn't it a good job money was spent on the buildings refurbishment a few years back... other wish it might not be up to standards.. or was that the plan all the time? 

Will this mean that money will be spent on the Town Hall , work is surely needed to stop the stonework and brickwork from decaying any more.. the clock and bells need work and the removal of years of pigeon droppings in the bell tower needs to be done or so I have been informed. 

Hyde like many of the towns in Tameside is a shadow of how it was... and are left to tick over on the scraps that not being spent on Ashton, or many (to many) councilors expenses. 

Knowledge, thoughts and comments on this matter will be appreciated, as long as they are relevant to this post and not at each other everyone one is welcome to voice their opinion.    

8 comments:

Gerald (SK14) said...

This also follows on the so-called public consultation exercise where the public said they could close the smaller libraries if the main town libraries were kept open - the council took it as a mandate to close libraries and now they are set to renege on the promise to keep Hyde library &c open with improved resources.

Chris Han said...

It is sad, but let's face it, in today's age of ebooks, media downloads, Kindle's, Nook's, and the internet, it doesn't come as a surprise.
My only fear is that they find a good use within the public or the private sector for this gorgeous building.

JohnT said...

It should be made a listed building.

Anonymous said...

Nothing that I can see will ever replace the printed word ...a book.

Gerald (SK14) said...

Have done a post on the library at Hyde DP Xtra

Anonymous said...

Such ashame , I live in hyde and ave done sone 43yrs, rents too high shops closing etc, make this a ghost town. We need a cash boost, what aload of old rubbish they did to the market, laughable , put back the fountain and old bus route sign. Open a decent pub, we need big names in hyde, slash prices of rents get them back. Tandy, frank dees, tweedl dee tweedle dum, lol, gs times,

VC said...

I have lived in Hyde for thirty years and to be honest it just feels that all available monies go to Ashton and scant regard is paid to the rest of the borough.

GreatNorburyStDepot said...

Re: Hyde Library relocation.

Further to the above topic, I thought you might be interested in some information concerning a former Chief Librarian at Hyde - Mr K.C.(Ken) Harrison. Reading from his biography (A Librarian's Odyssey), he was born in 1915 in White Hart Street, Flowery Field and later attended Hyde Grammar School. In October 1931, he applied for the post of "articled school assistant" at Hyde Public library. Following a successful interview by the Mayor of Hyde and members of the Library committee, he began an association with the building which would eventually see him become Chief Librarian. He was married locally in 1941 at St Thomas's church. After serving six years in the infantry during WW2, he returned to Hyde to take up his duties again. He left Hyde library in 1947, to become to take up posts at Hove, Eastbourne and Hendon, before ultimately becoming the City Librarian of Westminster. It seems he was very instrumental in the continued development of the municipal library service, both here and abroad and wrote many books on the subject. In later years, he was awarded both the MBE (Military) and OBE (Civil) honours. He passed away in 2006. Had he still been around, I wonder what Mr Harrison would think of the events unfolding in Hyde's public library of 2014?