Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Friday, 29 June 2012

Adverts from The Hyde Guide

How many of these businesses are still operating today?


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Sent to us by Marjorie Robinson.
Many Thanks, Marjorie!

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think there is only one of these businesses still operatingand that is Armitages Builders.

Anonymous said...

this is an odd one, the tanker in the add for hyde agricultural machinery. i knew that there was someone making these sort of things in newton years ago but my dad had one of these i never knew it was made in hyde and it was the only one like it i had seen till this posting, i also scrapped it a few years ago and took it to the scrap yard that was chappel in one of the other adds. coincidentaly we now have on order a new tanker on the same lines but i must say some things have improved with the passing of time.

mark

Werneth Low said...

Ah yes, Armitages. I remember it well as it was situated just riund the bend of Stockport Road from my house. I think in the old days they advertised themselves as joiners, builders and funeral directors - coffins were made in house in those days of course, of real wood. I recall the building side if the business developing the area stretching from Rowbottom Street to part of King Edward Road and putting up modern houses which still stand but are no longer modern. Acorn Avenue was born in this development. The entrance to their builders' yard was through a hard to negotiate turning off Stockport Road next to the Methodist church and the house adjacent was where Leslie and Annie Armitage lived - they ran the funeral side of things. Next door to that was a bread shop/confectioners which I think was called Bridges, and just on the bend was a tobacconists/sweet shop run by Lily Armitage. When my mother died I sold her house at 220 Stockport Road to Armitages and, in fact, Gerald Armitage still owned it in 1999, 32 years later. They built a chapel of rest near the top of Rowbottom Street in the late 50s/early 60s - this has been featured in an earlier blog on this site, but is no longer standing. I think there was a time when Armitages were Gee Cross, but times change don't they?