Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Wednesday, 2 May 2012

George Street

George Street's location was from it's starting point at Edward St, (at this point it was known as George Street West), then crossing Rochfort St, Catherine St, Elizabeth St, Newton St, Clarendon St, Hamnett St and finally ending at Hoviley Brow.
During it's life George Street was one of the longest streets in Hyde and at various periods boasted around 12 public houses, the exact location of some of them cannot be ascertained:-

The Brunswick
Spinners Arms
Star Inn
Black Horse
Blue Pig
Boars Head
Carpenters Arms
Dog and Partridge
Railway Tavern
Royal Hotel
Sun Inn
Woodman Inn

At the bottom end of George St was a large factory known in the early days as Brookside Hat Works, later taken over by Oldham & Fogg , Felt hat makers and then by Northide ltd who made protective clothing.

In 1833 a small chapel was built on George st for the "Methodist New Connexion" church. This was later substantially enlarged incorporating school premises and a small burial ground in 1858. The name of the church was changed in 1907 to the United Methodist Church.

George Street was virtually eliminated when the new motorway was constructed in the late 1970's. I say virtually because you can still walk on a part of what was George Street West. If you go down Edward Street, near the railway bridge on Manchester Road, the area at the very bottom, approx the width of the road square, was part of George Street West.

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Map of George Street area around the 1840's.

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The bottom end of George Street looking down towards Hoviley in the early 1960's. The shop on the right at the junction of Russell Street was S. Bridge, upholsterers and carpet fitters. 

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The bottom end of George Street at the junction with Hoviley Brow. The large factory was Northide Ltd, who made industrial and protective clothing. Approx date early 1960's. 

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A 125 Manchester bus parked up in Hyde Bus station, George Street at the back with Tanner Street to the right.

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George Street Shops looking down towards Newton Street, approx 1950's.

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United Methodist School Building approx 1960's

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Looking down George Street from Newton Street, Spinners Arms on left.

5 comments:

Tom said...

Paul sorry I was editing this and lost a couple of pictures..

Tom said...

Great post Paul... some fine pictures here...

Hydonian said...

Great post Paul !
George Street was a sad loss to Hyde !

Dave Williams said...

The last photo shows a Ford Consul Mk 1, which went into production in 1951, coming towards the camera. The car parked on the other side of the road is either a Ford Anglia or Prefect 100E, both of which went on sale in 1953. There was also a Ford Popular 100E but they didn't start making that till 1959 and the photo certainly seems to pre-date that.

Marjorie said...

A relative of mine lived on George St. When he was a boy his father would give him a penny if he could tell him the names of all the families who lived all along their side of the street. Quite a feat of memory training!
My Grandmother worked at Oldham & Fogg's. I often used to call in to see her and watch the hats being made. Strange machinery worked by belts and pulleys, men working in clogs on duckboards, lots of hot water and masses of steam everywhere, but no-one ever stopped me going in. No elf 'n' safety in those days. It was much pleasanter in the Trimming department where my mother worked and whilst waiting for her to finish work I have tied many a bow for the leather inside men's hats.