Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Friday, 16 August 2013

Castle Street View

Thank you to Chris for today's post.

I believe the photo was taken around the 1960's from Castle Street  on the approach to Newton Station. In the foreground we see the roofs of the houses on Bottom Street, the old chimney of North's Tannery Mill, and just visible behind the chimney is Bottom Row.


 photo NewtonViaduct1.jpg

I personally love this part of Hyde, or 'Lost Hyde' as I like to call it, as this severed part of Sheffield Road, which is visible in the photo, is relatively untouched, and it's cobbles remain untarmac'd and quite well preserved for it's full length.

 photo 1897.jpg

2 comments:

Graeme Green said...

As a child we would roam all around this area including this part of newton, I remember a spring just off this cobbled section of Sheffield road a little way down below the embankment of the station and was called the wishing well, it was down a short passage way between two small gardens / allotments, it allways had several pennies in the water which folk had tossed to presumably to wish for good luck. It had a small wooden gate across the entrance.

Chris Han said...

The ground immediately in front of the photographer in the picture is where the 'new' Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witness is now located.

I also believe the reservoir which was under the viaduct was referred to as 'Sammy's pit'.