Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
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Tuesday, 7 February 2012

Bowlacre Lane & Farm

I thought that the more affluent area's of Hyde should get a mention in the Blog, so I've found a bit of info and a few photos of Bowlacre Lane in Gee Cross.
The History of Hyde by Tom Middleton has the following to say on the subject:-

Bowlacre Lane, which branches from Stockport Road, above the Gerrards, leads to Bowlacre Farm, and a path through the farmyard wanders through the fields in a westerly direction, and ultimately emerges in a lane near the cluster of stone houses known as "Back-o-th-hill", Here there are two farms--Higher Back-o-th-hill, and Lower Back-o-th-hill. The path continues to a third farm known as Hillside, which is almost on the boundary line of the borough. This farm has an ornamental lintel stone dated 1746.


The Tithe map below shows the area in the mid 1800's, when the whole area was farmland. Bowlacre Lane itself seems to have been started around the 1880-1890's. The "Croft" and "White Gates" showing first on the 1900 map. The Lane was later extended up to it's present end near to Bowlacre farm.

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The construction of the large house at No 18 Bowlacre known as "Rusland" probably in the 1940's.

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4 comments:

Hydonian said...

Love these photos, Paul !
Bowlacre or "Bowl Acre" as it says on the tithe maps has always been a desirable spot by the looks of things!

Tom said...

Excellent post and pictures Paul... it is a long time since I've walked around here..

Bill Lancashire said...

Strangely enough I walked around there last Sunday. Take the path on the left between the fences as you approach the farm (just past Ricky Hatton's new house) then head up the field towards the lone tree in the centre of the hedge facing you. Having passed through the (very muddy) gap in the hedge, take a diagonal route across the next field to the style in the top right hand corner. Now follow the hedge on your right to the next style and you're on Lord Derby Road opposite the path through the farms leading up to up to Werneth Low Road.

Now stop, turn round and take in the view while you recover your breath!

Tom said...

Hi Bill.. it must be over 30 years since I did that walk... and thank you for bringing it back to mind...