Hyde Name Origins.

The name "HYDE" is derived from the hide, a measure of land for taxation purposes, taken to be that area of land necessary to support a peasant family. In later times it was taken to be equivalent to 120 acres .
March 2014
BLOG still being updated, please keep commenting as it all goes to making a good read and helps to build an archive.


Tuesday, 22 March 2011

Turbine Service Station

Mottram Road And Fernally Street

Photobucket


Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


Photobucket

We were sent these in a few weeks back and I was thrilled to see them... I was hoping to find out some information about this garage that seems to be remembered by quite a few of our readers. Please let us know as much about it as possible.... it was in business for many years let there is so little wrote down about it.  Check out those prices by the way... and I wonder how much petrol was back then...  If you can name the cars please do so.

I would have liked to have mentioned who sent these great pictures in... but we seem to have lost quite a few 'Saved' emails... most likely my fault tidying up at 'Daft O-Clock' at night. Please let me know who you are and I of course will update the post to thank you.

UPDATE

Thanks to Janet Davies for the wonderful photos - Very welcomed as always ! :)

5 comments:

Dave Williams said...

Without doing much searching around yet I think:
Photo 1 (and photos 5 & 6) the cars inside the showroom appear to be Standards, both pre- and post-war. The car in photo 1 (and photo 2) seen through the open doorway MAY be an SS Jaguar, but I can't enlarge it enough to make a positive identification. In the 3rd and 4th photos the car in the centre is an Austin 7 and the car at the rear, framed by the breakdown truck, is a Ford V8 (which later became the Ford Pilot. I'll carry on digging.

Hydonian said...

I believe it was Janet Davies ,Tom :)

Tom said...

Thanks for up dating the post Nancy... and Dave I knew you could be counted on on this one... these pictures will get some attention I'm sure.

Dave Williams said...

In the first couple of photos you can see 2 petrol pumps through the open doorway. The first one looks like a Shell pump - the illuminated top was shaped like a shell - and the second one is, I think, a BP pump, the top of which was square and had a shield inscribed with the letters 'BP'.

Dave Williams said...

The cars in photo 5, as I said, appear to be Standards and I would say they're all what were known as 'Flying Standards'. From left to right they seem to be the Standard Flying 14, Flying 20, Flying 8 and Flying 12. In photo 3 the light coloured car on the left nearest to the camera, and facing away from it has the distinctive streamlined tail of the Standard Flying 12. The car in front of it may be a Morris, and the large car furthest away from the camera and facing away from it in the centre of the picture, well something's saying 'Armstrong Siddeley' to me but I can't find any pictures to confirm my ancient memory. I suppose it could equally well be a Rolls Royce, Bentley or Daimler, and there we've got the same problem with coach builders that we had with the buses.